Linguistics and New Testament Greek

Key Issues in the Current Debate

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Students often feel burdened by the sheer volume and technicality of books written in the field of linguistics in relation to the New Testament. This accessibly written work offers students the most current discussion of the major issues in Greek and linguistics by leading authorities in the field.

Each chapter provides an overview of a key topic. Featuring an all-star lineup of New Testament Greek scholars, this book examines the latest advancements in New Testament Greek linguistics, making it an ideal intermediate supplemental Greek textbook.

Contents
Preface: Where Did We Come From? David Alan Black
1. Linguistic Schools Stanley E. Porter
2. Aspect and Tense in New Testament Greek Constantine R. Campbell
3. The Greek Perfect Tense-Form: Understanding Its Usage and Meaning Michael G. Aubrey
4. The Greek Middle Voice: An Important Rediscovery and Implications for Teaching and Exegesis Jonathan T. Pennington
5. Discourse Analysis: Galatians as a Case Study Stephen H. Levinsohn
6. Interpreting Constituent Order in Koine Greek Steven E. Runge
7. Living Language Approaches T. Michael W. Halcomb
8. The Role of Pronunciation in New Testament Greek Studies Randall Buth
9. Electronic Tools and New Testament Greek Thomas W. Hudgins
10. An Ideal Beginning Greek Grammar? Robert L. Plummer
11. Biblical Exegesis and Linguistics: A Prodigal History Nicholas J. Ellis
Postscript: Where Do We Go from Here? Benjamin L. Merkle
Glossary
Indexes


Endorsements

"Advances in linguistics have made significant contributions to our understanding of biblical Greek and hence our interpretation of the biblical text. Even so, many New Testament students and scholars are often unaware of these advances or find it difficult to know where to begin to understand the issues and how to appropriate linguistic contributions for their own studies. Linguistics and New Testament Greek offers essays by scholars who are actively engaged in current linguistic and New Testament scholarship. These essays survey the issues and debates in clear and accessible language that will help the nonspecialist as well as those who are already reasonably familiar with some of these issues. This volume goes a long way toward building a solid bridge between linguistic advances and the study of New Testament Greek."

Dana M. Harris, associate professor of New Testament, Trinity Evangelical Divinity School

"Linguistics and biblical exegesis often seem like estranged family members. The essays in this volume give readers a snapshot of some of the discussions taking place in linguistics, and it is instructive to see where the contributors agree and where they dissent. Virtually all the authors explain the relevance of their contribution for biblical studies, and I hope this book will be one step forward in restoring the relationship between linguistics and exegesis."

Thomas R. Schreiner, James Buchanan Harrison Professor of New Testament Interpretation and associate dean, Southern Baptist Theological Seminary

"In this welcome volume, leading specialists address major questions currently being discussed in the linguistic study of the New Testament. It will no doubt be appreciated by those with a good command of New Testament Greek who are interested in supplementing their practical competence with a viable theoretical basis."

Heinrich von Siebenthal, Staatsunabhängige Theologische Hochschule Basel; author of Ancient Greek Grammar for the Study of the New Testament


The Authors

  1. David Alan Black

    David Alan Black

    David Alan Black (DTheol, University of Basel) is senior professor of New Testament and Greek and Dr. M. O. Owens Jr. Chair of New Testament Studies at Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary in Wake Forest, North Carolina. He is the author of...

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  2. Benjamin L. Merkle
    Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary

    Benjamin L. Merkle

    Benjamin L. Merkle (PhD, Southern Baptist Theological Seminary) is professor of New Testament and Greek at Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary in Wake Forest, North Carolina. He is the coauthor of Greek for Life: Strategies for Learning, Retaining,...

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