Apocalypticism, Prophecy, and Magic in Early Christianity

Collected Essays

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"I would find it difficult to conduct research on ancient apocalypses and apocalypticism, or on the book of Revelation, without this volume by my side. Its inclusion in university and personal libraries is strongly recommended."--Lorenzo DiTommaso, Review of Biblical Literature

Renowned scholar David Aune, author of a leading commentary on the book of Revelation, here offers twenty studies on apocalypticism, the book of Revelation, and related topics. Several essays on the Apocalypse of John explore contextual relationships of the Apocalypse to apocalyptic literature. Other essays center on aspects of the content and interpretation of the Apocalypse itself by investigating issues such as discipleship, narrative Christology, genre, and the problem of God and time. Essays on early Christian prophecy deal with charismatic exegesis in early Judaism and early Christianity, the relationship between Christian prophecy and the messianic status of Jesus, and the prophetic features found in The Odes of Solomon. Originally published in hardcover by Mohr Siebeck, this volume is now available in paperback.


The Author

  1. David E. Aune

    David E. Aune

    David E. Aune (PhD, University of Chicago) is Walter Professor of New Testament, emeritus, at the University of Notre Dame. He is the editor of Rereading Paul Together and the author of a three-volume commentary on the book of Revelation (Word Biblical...

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Reviews

"In many respects [this book] accompanies the author's three-volume Word Commentary [on Revelation]. . . . Individual essays represent a variety of approaches, literary, historical, and sociological, reflecting the depth and breadth of the author's scholarship. This volume will prove a useful and accessible resource, comparable in scale to a fourth volume of the commentary, and will provide readers with further benefits of the concentration of scholarly energy and insight which went into those volumes."--Nicholas H. Taylor, Journal for the Study of the New Testament Booklist

"Despite its unquestionable utility for scholars of Revelation, [this volume] is not simply a compilation of specialist papers on selected technical topics concerning the New Testament book. Rather, its title is entirely appropriate: this is a volume that deals with ancient Jewish and Christian apocalypticism, prophecy, and magic at a very high level. For this reason even its older essays . . . remain fresh and stimulating. What strikes one most about this collection is Aune's tremendous breadth of interest and expertise. . . . Aune brings to his investigation an immense knowledge of not only the Jewish, Christian, and classical literature of the era but also the documentary evidence, including the numismatic and inscriptive. . . . I would find it difficult to conduct research on ancient apocalypses and apocalypticism, or on the book of Revelation, without this volume by my side. Its inclusion in university and personal libraries is strongly recommended."--Lorenzo DiTommaso, Review of Biblical Literature

"This is a collection of some twenty essays . . . by one of the leading experts on the topics named in the title. . . . Serious students of the New Testament and fellow scholars will appreciate the unfailing erudition and lucidity of Aune's work."--Donald Senior, CP, Bible Today

"This book contains twenty essays by one of the most prolific and well respected scholars of Jewish and early Christian apocalyptic literature. . . . Aune's encyclopedic knowledge of Jewish and Roman background material is impressive, to say the least, and serves as an invaluable resource for the scholar and the student alike. . . . Aune's extensive research and knowledge is an important resource, and I would recommend the book as an essential volume for anyone interested in apocalypticism, prophecy, and/or magic in early Christianity."--Robby Waddell, Pneuma

"Aune's collection of twenty essays represents a quarter century of research into apocalypticism and early Christian origins. . . . Every study showcases Aune's trademark breadth and attention to detail. The bibliographical items alone offer a treasure trove of the latest and most relevant material for further research. . . . Throughout, the Greco-Roman world of Late Antiquity is both illuminated and made to illumine John's Apocalypse. Aune's analysis of the anti-magic apologetic in John's Apocalypse, in particular, is intriguing. . . . This is a volume I will return to again and again."--Juan Hernández Jr., Religious Studies Review